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SINGLE ORIGIN COLOMBIA FINCA CAFELINA

SINGLE ORIGIN COLOMBIA FINCA CAFELINA
Orange. Chocolate. Cherries

Say hello to your new favourite coffee. A classic all-rounder, great as an espresso, batch brew or as your morning chino. Blink and you'll miss it.
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$27.00
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Orange juice | Milk Chocolate | Fresh Cherries

COUNTRY: Colombia

REGION: Narino

CULTIVAR: Castillo, Colombia

PROCESSING: Washed

Edgar Ernesto Erazo Valencia owns the 10-hectare coffee farm called Cafelina, which is planted completely with Castillo and Colombia varieties. Edgar has been involved in coffee production his entire life, and he inherited his farm from his father—it is the farm Edgar and his siblings worked on when they were young, helping their father and learning about coffee.

Edgar harvests the coffee when the cherries are purple and depulps them that same afternoon. The coffee is sorted through a zaranda after depulping to remove any impurities and then is fermented between 15–22 hours before being washed three times. Coffee at Cafelina is either pre-dried in the sun for 12 hours and moved to parabolic dryers for 10–12 days, or in mechanical dryers for 25–30 hours if there is a very large harvest.